The Recruiter Reality

by The Red Recruiter on April 13, 2010

Big EyeFrom a candidate’s perspective, it may seem that recruiters sit on a perch and simply sift through resumes until the right one magically appears – not so.

Recruiters have clients to answer to; clients that hold them accountable for their decisions.  Presenting too many candidates that fall short of the client’s requirements will inevitably damage the recruiter’s reputation.  A lack of candidates due to overly complex or demanding requests will also take a toll.

The balance, at times, is very challenging.

As Picky As Possible

So, the challenge becomes how to balance between finding the right person and finding the right person quickly.

Before you tell me that technology has eliminated sourcing/recruiting challenges, I would ask you to consider a couple of points:

  1. There are often times too many candidates to review.  To paint a realistic picture, imagine you have just ten openings.  For each of those openings, you receive 100+ applicants.  You are now the proud responsible party for reviewing over 1000 resumes – makes the one page resume very attractive doesn’t it?
  2. People lie.  That’s right, they lie.  While technology helps us identify keywords and sift through potentials, it doesn’t help us cut through the lies.  Don’t get me wrong, I understand why people do it.  Most everyone wants to earn a living and be self-sufficient.  Unfortunately, some people take it too far and lie about what they are capable of, what they have accomplished in the past and, worst of all, actual jobs that they have performed.  It makes a recruiter’s job pretty difficult.

Pre-Interview: “Wow, this person looks perfect for the role!  They have all the skills and experience necessary – my client is going to be thrilled!”

Post-Interview: “They haven’t even worked with the technology they have listed… what were they thinking!?!?”

I know, I know… you would never do that.  Good.  But, believe it or not, it happens frequently.  Of course, it’s not polite to label it as lying – people simply “exaggerate.”

So, put yourself in the recruiter’s shoes at the time you submit your resume.  Too many resumes and a recruiter who is very accustomed to people exaggerating in an effort to get the interview.  On top of that, their clients expect delivery… and fast!

Work With Your Recruiter

Beyond what I have listed, there are hundreds of other small dynamics that go into recruiting… it’s a complicated sport.

So, knowing all this, I ask you to think about your approach and how you can work best with a recruiter.  Here are a few points to keep in mind:

  • Make sure your resume is concise, truthful, compelling and formatted well.
  • Realize that while you may think you are perfect for the job, the recruiter may know more about your suitability for the role than you do.
  • Be helpful… recruiters remember.  If you aren’t a match for the role, consider referring someone else for the position.  I can almost promise you that your recruiter will remember the trust and helpful disposition you displayed.  It’s likely that this will help when the right opening comes around.
  • It’s not personal.  If you are right for the role, the recruiter will push your candidacy forward.  If you’re not, they won’t.

Recruiters love placing the right person in the right position – it’s why we do what we do.  There is nothing more fulfilling for those who have chosen this as a career path.

So, recruiters… what’s your top suggestion for candidates who are out searching for that ideal role?

And how about you candidates?  Any best practices that you have been impressed with?  Has a recruiter knocked your socks off with their approach?

  • Recruiterbait

    If a recruiter brings me to their office to interview for a specific position, they should at least have the courtesy to respond to my follow-up call or email. No one is too busy to fire off an email to someone they spent an hour interviewing.

  • Recruiterbait

    If a recruiter brings me to their office to interview for a specific position, they should at least have the courtesy to respond to my follow-up call or email. No one is too busy to fire off an email to someone they spent an hour interviewing.

Previous post:

Next post: