The Death of Sourcing

by The Red Recruiter on November 10, 2009

3471826023_2aa3aa6ed9_bIn a recent conversation with someone I would consider to be pretty knowledgeable about the topic of

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finding candidates, he said “Sourcing is going to die.”

WHAT?

How could this be? All these years of learning the tips and tricks for finding the best hidden talent LinkedIn has to offer and it’s a dying art…?!? GASP!

The more I thought about his point, the more it started to make sense. The information we have access to on the internet isn’t getting less organized and more scattered. To the contrary, it’s starting to be compiled into nicely formatted and easy-to-access lists. There will come a time in the near future when finding a person will be the least of our worries (as recruiters). The trick will be attracting them.

Before you get angry because of all of the money you have spent on AIRS training, think about this for a moment…

As recruiters, there was a time (some argue that the time still exists), when we were compensated to both find and court the ideal candidates for our clients. If you are an internal (corporate) recruiter, you are/were paid to collect the inbound traffic, organize the candidates and figure out which ones were the best match. Some corporate recruiters have entered the realm of sourcing and active recruiting… albeit rare.

One, two… maybe five years from now, the amount of collected candidate information will be extreme. The perfect storm between the rise of social media and the high levels of unemployment are only feeding into rapidly populating these databases. While some information will remain confidential – the majority of candidates will become easily discoverable. More than likely, an organization (or more) will give clients the ability to access massive databases of both active and passive job seekers.

Sharpen Your Recruiting Swords

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again… the future of recruiting is about recruiting. Gone will be the days when finding the candidate somehow filled a gap in the recruiter job description – technology will take care of that.

Recruiters need to be developing their communication skills (verbal and non-verbal)! How effective will you be at representing your employer or client company at industry forums, over the phone and via online communication methods? Are you practicing?

On the flip side, how prepared will companies be to attract candidates once their recruiters have planted potential hires with a grain of interest? Has your employment branding kept pace with the market? Will you be an attractive company to work for once the economy fully recovers?

The future looks both fast-paced and competitive! Are you ready?

Photo Credit, Titine

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  • http://www.jerrytherecruiter.com/ Jerry Albright

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  • http://www.jerrytherecruiter.com Jerry Albright

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  • Bob

    Michael,

    I fully agree that communication skills amongst recruiters is key. I can think of 2 times in the past year that I have been contacted by recruiters via linked-in due to having a relatively high profile in my industry and the recruiters dropped the ball.

    One of the firms that I was contacted about is a rapidly growing leader in its space but I lost interest in the company once I could not get the recruiter to give me updates and or set up timely calls with company executives. (And again this recruiter contacted me via one of the groups I lead on LinkedIn)

    The economy is recovering and hot rapidly growing firms that utilize recruiters who contact top talent via Linkedin or other Social Media tools that subsequently drop the ball communicating with the highly prized candidate (especially passive candidates who are already employed) will be passed over and top candidates will stick to talking with stable growth companies (Amazon, Microsoft, Bearing Point etc) whose recruiters do indeed communicate well and return emails and phone calls.

  • Bob

    Michael,

    I fully agree that communication skills amongst recruiters is key. I can think of 2 times in the past year that I have been contacted by recruiters via linked-in due to having a relatively high profile in my industry and the recruiters dropped the ball.

    One of the firms that I was contacted about is a rapidly growing leader in its space but I lost interest in the company once I could not get the recruiter to give me updates and or set up timely calls with company executives. (And again this recruiter contacted me via one of the groups I lead on LinkedIn)

    The economy is recovering and hot rapidly growing firms that utilize recruiters who contact top talent via Linkedin or other Social Media tools that subsequently drop the ball communicating with the highly prized candidate (especially passive candidates who are already employed) will be passed over and top candidates will stick to talking with stable growth companies (Amazon, Microsoft, Bearing Point etc) whose recruiters do indeed communicate well and return emails and phone calls.

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