Excitement In Recruiting

by The Red Recruiter on December 30, 2009

I read a post on Seth Godin’s blog today that really struck a chord.  Perhaps because the advice so closely aligns with my own philosophy – perhaps because it was short… either way, it’s great and you should take a look!

“The difference between hiring and recruiting”

Essentially, the point is made that hiring is more of a call for applicants.  People find your posting, they apply, you interview… eventually hire.

Recruiting, on the other hand, is about attracting a person to a role based on how great the position is.  Creating a need in the candidate that can only be filled once the person takes the necessary step of applying and, hopefully, is hired.

I guess the question I’m left with is “How?”.

Creating A Job That Attracts

I’m not a job description expert by any means… but, I have learned a few things about recruiting a person based on their emotional  and logical responses to a role.

If I had to sit down and write a job description to accomplish this task, I would probably consider some of the following.

  1. Description Vs. Painting – Are you just listing the duties of the role OR are you painting a picture?  Think about what makes this position amazing for the ideal target candidate.  If it doesn’t inspire at least AWE on a scale of A to AWESOME, you might want to reconsider your description before chucking it out to the world.  Take a few more minutes at least.
  2. Emotion Vs. Logic – People consider changing their jobs for many reasons.  However, most of these reasons fall into either logical or emotional categories – some both.  While financial gain may be a logical reason, the ability to send ones children to a better daycare is, more than likely, emotional.  Look at the offered job as a job seeker.  Why would you consider it?  Why not?  Does it excite you?  If not… why would it excite your target?  Does the position give the candidate logical reasons to consider?  What do you want them to tell their spouse before risking it all on this new role?  Think about it.
  3. Aim For A Smile – Humor has a way of creating a positive emotional connection with the things around us.  Consider including some humor in your job description before posting it.  “We are the leader in X, Y and Z… and, oh yeah, we have some pretty amazing fresh coffee in the break room!”  A smile creates an emotion, an emotion creates a feeling, a feeling creates a connection.  If you establish a connection with the person you are recruiting, it’s much more likely that you will have both candid and meaningful conversations with them.
  4. Keep It Short – I know what you are thinking… “Job seekers will want to know all the details before applying for a job.”  I disagree.  Treat the description as a marketing campaign.  Would you want to learn more based on what you read?  Would you tell a friend about the position based on how interesting it is?  If so, you are on the right track.  Keep it short, simple and as enticing as possible.  In an age of ADD, let Twitter‘s 140 character limit inspire you!  Less is more (as long as it’s meaningful!).

I like what Seth had to say on the topic because it promotes the necessary delineation in recruiting.  If we fail to see that the two acts (hiring vs. recruiting) are essentially different, we will fail to ultimately attract the variety necessary to make a solid hiring decision.  Don’t you want the best possible person for the role?  Would 10 more minutes of thought behind the position be worth attracting a better suited candidate?

What have you done to spice up your job descriptions before shotgunning them across the internet?  Any best practices?

Have you seen a company that has pulled this off well?  If so, share what you’ve found!

Photo Credit, drcorneilus

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  • http://www.twitter.com/melshel99 @melshel99

    Great post Michael! I couldn't agree more. Highlighting your organization's unique selling points is also an important consideration. Short and sweet but a few key points can set you a part from your competitors and is an effective technique to intrigue candidates to click through and learn more. As a recruitment advertising professional, assisting clients in this area, there is surprisingly still quite a bit of push back. I assume from some sort of legal standpoint. This kind of change is not always welcome and a demand for lengthy, corporate jargoned, postings live on.

  • http://theredrecruiter.com theredrecruiter

    Thanks for the comment! Yes… it's going to be an uphill battle – sooner or later companies will realize that job seekers are as interested in the personality of the company as they are the traditional elements that make an organization successful!

  • http://theredrecruiter.com theredrecruiter

    Thanks for the comment! Yes… it's going to be an uphill battle – sooner or later companies will realize that job seekers are as interested in the personality of the company as they are the traditional elements that make an organization successful!

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