Creating a Personal Brand Statement

by Meghan M. Biro on September 3, 2009

SandinhandThe discussion of the benefits of developing a personal brand when preparing for a behavioral interview led to some discussion here about the process of creating a personal brand statement – one that can lead to a career statement that will support you when you’re interviewing for a position. I want to go through the initial steps of building a personal brand statement, and look at how it translates into a career statement.

Let’s chat about Catherine, a recent college graduate with a degree in economics and a minor in marketing, as an example. Catherine was interested in finding a job in market research or brand marketing.

Catherine’s personality is memorable – she is enthusiastic, energetic, charming, and thoughtful. There are no hard edges on this girl, just a huge heart, an inquisitive mind, and a drive to perfection.

Because a personal brand encompasses skills, interests, attributes and values, we began by conducting a skills inventory, listing interests, evaluating personality attributes and discussing Catherine’s values.

Then, before we committed a brand definition to paper, I asked Catherine a question I always ask: what are the three things you want someone to remember about you? (NOTE: This is a key question that you can revisit whenever searching for inspiration!)

For Catherine, the answer was: honesty, intelligence and energy.

It turns out that the three things she most prized about herself don’t have anything to do with economics or marketing (this is often the case where real-life meets career), and aren’t directly applicable to a career statement. They are, however, the backbone of her personal brand, and with these words we were able to begin to construct a personal brand statement that differentiated Catherine from other candidates. Here’s her personal brand statement:

A driven, inquisitive, analytical and direct marketer

Here’s her personal brand statement evolved to a career statement:

A driven, inquisitive, and direct marketer skilled in quantitative analysis with the ability to identify the intersection of market needs, product and service attributes, and perceived value.

The next step Catherine and I will take is to create a list of attributes she is looking for in an employer, which she will use to evaluate opportunities for potential personality-culture fit. We will then run through a few mock interview scenarios to ensure Catherine’s presentation of herself is authentic, powerful and compelling for employers and beyond.

How would you set about creating your personal brand statement? Give it some thought.

Guest Blogger: Meghan M. Biro, founder of TalentCulture, is a globally-recognized expert in talent acquisition, creative personal and corporate branding and new media strategies that accelerate talent acquisition.

Photo Credit, lepiaf.geo

  • http://www.sanerapdc.com/ Alicia Arenas (@AliciaSanera)

    Meghan this is a great post. I love how you tied a largely sales and marketing oriented concept into something actionable for candidates. Fantastic!

    Alicia

  • http://www.sanerapdc.com Alicia Arenas (@AliciaSanera)

    Meghan this is a great post. I love how you tied a largely sales and marketing oriented concept into something actionable for candidates. Fantastic!

    Alicia

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @AliciaSanera Thanks very much. Glad you enjoyed A.

    The goal was to provide a tangible example based on a previous request from one of our readers – I aim to please :)

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @AliciaSanera Thanks very much. Glad you enjoyed A.

    The goal was to provide a tangible example based on a previous request from one of our readers – I aim to please :)

  • http://www.careertrend.net/ Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter

    Meghan,
    Though I have ‘grappled’ with the language ‘personal branding,’ I realize it is here to stay! :) I tend to lean my language toward ‘value, value, value’ (i.e., value proposition, value drivers, etc.). I realize, more and more, how personal branding ties in with that language. (Thank you for further educating me!)

    All that said, I love what you said regarding the 3 things Catherine prized about herself having nothing to do with economics / marketing. Then, through your action steps with her, Catherine and you knit together a value-focused brand and career statement.

    Nicely done! And as usual, the story you shared is quite fluidly and meaningfully written.

    Thank you!
    Jacqui (@ValueIntoWords)

  • http://www.careertrend.net Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter

    Meghan,
    Though I have ‘grappled’ with the language ‘personal branding,’ I realize it is here to stay! :) I tend to lean my language toward ‘value, value, value’ (i.e., value proposition, value drivers, etc.). I realize, more and more, how personal branding ties in with that language. (Thank you for further educating me!)

    All that said, I love what you said regarding the 3 things Catherine prized about herself having nothing to do with economics / marketing. Then, through your action steps with her, Catherine and you knit together a value-focused brand and career statement.

    Nicely done! And as usual, the story you shared is quite fluidly and meaningfully written.

    Thank you!
    Jacqui (@ValueIntoWords)

  • http://hrringleader.wordpress.com/ Trish McFarlane

    Inspiring post Meghan. I especially like that you took us through the steps with Catherine. It demonstrates how having the right guidance can truly improve the candidates personal branding message.

  • http://hrringleader.wordpress.com Trish McFarlane

    Inspiring post Meghan. I especially like that you took us through the steps with Catherine. It demonstrates how having the right guidance can truly improve the candidates personal branding message.

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  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @ValueIntoWords As always > Thoughtful commentary Jacqui. Happy to share my experience. I’m in love with the idea of continuous learning.

    If not creating a platform for meaning why are we even doing this? 😉 Appreciate you.

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @ValueIntoWords As always > Thoughtful commentary Jacqui. Happy to share my experience. I’m in love with the idea of continuous learning.

    If not creating a platform for meaning why are we even doing this? 😉 Appreciate you.

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @TrishMcFarlane Thanks very much Trish. Nice to see you.

    Walking through the steps is important for our community – the right guidance + clarity is key when communicating a brand message.

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @TrishMcFarlane Thanks very much Trish. Nice to see you.

    Walking through the steps is important for our community – the right guidance + clarity is key when communicating a brand message.

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  • http://www.RamerGroup.com/ Mike Ramer

    Meghan, Love this post. You really dig in and define personal brand positioning from the client’s point of view. In my Career Coaching and Job Search Consulting practice, I also emphasize to my clients the importance of making the “first few words” memorable – in a resume, an elevator pitch or an interview. In fact, one of my clients was recently asked on an interview: State one word in which your 1) prior manager 2) your spouse 3) your best friend would describe you. An exercise for everyone. Well done!

  • http://www.RamerGroup.com Mike Ramer

    Meghan, Love this post. You really dig in and define personal brand positioning from the client’s point of view. In my Career Coaching and Job Search Consulting practice, I also emphasize to my clients the importance of making the “first few words” memorable – in a resume, an elevator pitch or an interview. In fact, one of my clients was recently asked on an interview: State one word in which your 1) prior manager 2) your spouse 3) your best friend would describe you. An exercise for everyone. Well done!

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @MikeRamer Thanks much Mike. Valuable additional feedback.

    Building an authentic career vocabulary takes thought + creativity when the goal is to draw distinction + make memorable. Appreciate your comments.

  • http://www.talentculture.com/ Meghan M. Biro

    @MikeRamer Thanks much Mike. Valuable additional feedback.

    Building an authentic career vocabulary takes thought + creativity when the goal is to draw distinction + make memorable. Appreciate your comments.

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